J.E. in Late Spring

When I went to J.E. to check on the cameras I saw things expected and unexpected.

The two most notable unexpected things were the very dark, tall, and large coyote that would get his photo taken at Stand #2, and the second surprise was that the beavers had raised the dam by at least 18”, which of course raised the water level right up to the road.

J.E. Road

J.E. Road

Not surprising was that the amphibians were taking full advantage of this new environment. I was serenaded by frogs the whole time I was there. I was also serenaded by the forest’s premier songster the hermit thrush. Easily the most beautiful voice of any of our native songbirds. You can hear it here.

Hermit Thrush

Hermit Thrush

Not surprising was to see the brook trout taking full advantage of the pond. I saw one that was about 7″. He or she was probably somewhere between 6 and 8 years old. One raised in a hatchery that old would be 20″+ and 4 or more pounds. It will grow much faster in the pond because of simple math. Less energy expended, not fighting the stronger current of the brook, not spending calories sitting in colder water, and more calorie intake because of the increase in insect and amphibian life.

The Rhodora and lady slippers were blooming everywhere.

Rhodora

Rhodora

There was a considerable amount of moose and turkey sign and some deer and grouse (partridge) sign as well. I got several photos of the deer and turkeys along with a raccoon who doesn’t seem to know that he is supposed to be nocturnal.

Diurnal Raccoon

Diurnal Raccoon

The mosquitoes are out in full force.

WLAGS

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A Beauty

Look what showed up at Stand #2 moments before he attacked the camera!

Coyote at Stand #2

Coyote at Stand #2

This is only the second coyote that I have seen with such a dark face. It is not one that I have seen around here before.

Notice the light band behind the shoulders.

I got several other good photos of deer and turkeys, but nothing as exciting as this.

WLAGS