The Bobcat or Bobcats of WLA

I should have mentioned, if I didn’t, that last winter I got a few photos and videos of a bobcat, but they were not of a quality suitable for the blog.

Later this spring, Debbie saw a bobcat crossing our street, going from the lake to the woods side.

Then in June and July several of the neighbors, especially Heidi, told me of hearing strange screaming and other obviously animal vocal sounds. In one of those instances, Heidi heard them and a few minutes later heard the thud of feet hitting the deck where she was sitting, and she found herself face to face with a bobcat. She screamed and they both took off in opposite directions.

A few days later, I got several photos of a bobcat at J.E. Stand #2. Some were surprisingly late in the morning on two different occasions.

Bobcat Approaching Stand #2

Bobcat Approaching Stand #2

I sent them to Heidi, and she thought the coloration was different, very likely, so it is safe to say we have more than one in residence here.

One of the Bobcats of WLA

One of the Bobcats of WLA

They are some of the best photos I’ve ever gotten of a cat.

WLAGS

 

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J.E. in Late July

I have not been into J.E. for weeks largely due to the fact that Tony’s dog Angie went missing on Father’s Day. An all-out effort has been put forth by an army of friends and family. One of my contributions to the effort was three of my cameras that I pulled from J.E.. So between my granddog missing and the lack of cameras, I had little inspiration. She is still missing, and Tony thinks that she might have been taken by someone who has decided to keep her. You can help by “liking” and sharing the Help Bring Angie Home Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/HelpBringAngieHome).

It was as good a morning as you can get in late July, weather-wise, for a hike–seventies and low humidity. The first thing I noticed was the water levels. Due in part to last night’s rain, there was water everywhere. It was within 2″ of the bridge leading to the apple tree. The apple tree looked good, but no apples for the second year in a row. I think that is due to a lack of a nearby pollinator. I hope to change that next year or even this fall.

The rain has been awesome for the fingerling brook trout. I saw some in every pool. It has also made for an unusually strong mushroom crop for this early in the season. However the dominant varieties were the “Rosy” Russula (Russula rosea) and the Russula paludosa. They are the large, red-capped ones. They are edible, but many people cannot eat them, so I am not recommending that you do, also because they look a lot like the Russula emetica, which is poisonous. There were many other varieties popping up everywhere.

Rosy Russula

Rosy Russula

 

Russula Paludosa

Russula Paludosa

 

Russula Emetica

Russula Emetica

 

 

 

 

 

The low bush blueberry crop is a bust in the woods. There are some in the fields. I twice came upon a man picking some, and he was so intent on the task at hand that he was totally unaware of me. I didn’t make my presence known for fear of startling him as I passed within a few feet of him.

I still had one camera out at Buck Knob, and I got some great daylight and up-close photos of a bull moose with his antlers just starting to grow.

Moose Growing Back His Antlers

Moose Growing Back His Antlers

I also saw moose track, presumably his, at Stand #1.

WLAGS