The Moose Are Very Active in J.E.

The Moose Are Very Active in J.E.

Today, there was moose sign EVERYWHERE! As I stated last time they were using all “my” trails.

This photo is of what greeted us as we passed through the gate. It is bull droppings on Rte.1 right along the beaver pond. The droppings stretch from me to my granddaughter. In hind sight, I should have paced it off.

Bull Moose Droppings

Bull Moose Droppings

I took this photo of the brook at the same place I did last time to show how much things have changed in six days.

The Brook Six Days Later

The Brook Six Days Later

We were in moose sign all morning. One passed right in front of Stand # 1 and just to the left of Stand #2, just out of camera’s view. Then that one, a bull, headed for the Tunnel, where it bedded down. Note how much bigger this bed is compared to the earlier ones.

Bull Moose Bed

Bull Moose Bed

There were several sets of track going up and down the trail from Stand #1 to Stand #3 and past the Fork. We came across four beds, countless droppings, and browse sign. There was no hair or ticks in any of the beds, thankfully. This photo is in the gully at the end of Route 1A, below Dana’s Knob. 

Gully

Gully

As soon as we went through the Tunnel, the sign increased as we were now in the Matriarch’s home range.

She and the bull were obviously spending some time together. Would you believe that they were all over Buck Knob but never stepped in front of the camera?

After checking the camera at Stand #1, which my granddaughter had to climb, where there was much sign, we headed for the camera by the gate.

All along the way—the field, Frog Pond, and both brooks—there was sign. This all had to happen in the last 24+ hours because of all the snow we lost after the snowfall 36 hours earlier. These conditions are ripe for shed hunting.

Tony Found These Antlers in J.E. in 2010

Tony Found These Antlers in J.E. in 2010

On another note, my frustration with the Stealth camera continues!

There were moose, fox, and coyote tracks in front of the camera—most of it crossing, despite my effort to aim it down the trails—and not a SINGLE video of any of them! But all is not lost. It took a good daytime video of a bobcat. However, again the poor trigger speed reared its ugly head. The bobcat was in the middle of the screen (moving right to left) before the camera triggered. In other words I got half the video I should have.

It frustrates me to the point that I’m ready to shoot it, but I’m already down two cameras as my two oldest Bushnell cameras finally died last fall.

It is looking like that not-so-crazy woodchuck in Pennsylvania might be right.

WLAGS

 

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The Matriarch Moose of J.E.

The Matriarch Moose of J.E.

I was greeted by moose sign everywhere at J. E. this afternoon. I wanted to see how the wildlife was handling this current COLD spell. I took one photo to show the babbling brook that is no longer babbling. It is one of the very few times that I have seen the brook not running due to ice.

Frozen Brook

Frozen Brook

I honestly cannot remember the last time I saw this phenomenon. A minus 50 wind chill and many hours of subzero temps will do that.

As I approached Stand #2, I crossed fresh (less than 12-hour old), moose track coming down the gully between the first 2 stands by Dana’s Knob. When I got to #2, the moose had crossed towards the Fork before reaching the camera. The camera by the way had a great midday video of a coyote.

I tracked the moose only because I was confident that she had passed long enough ago that I would not spook her. I didn’t want to stress her under these conditions forcing her to burn badly needed calories. I did want to look for any sign of winter tick. The good news is, if you look at the photos I took of two of her beds, there was no hair loss and no ticks.

Moose Bed With Just a Few Hairs

Moose Bed With Just a Few Hairs

Another Moose Bed

Another Moose Bed

My walking stick, which I included in the photos for reference, is 54″. She traveled all of my trails, which are actually game trails (mostly deer and moose trails) that I choose to follow from place to place.

She, the matriarch moose of J. E., has been there for at least 6 years and maybe 7 if you include her first year as a calf. She spends most of her time between the swamps near the main trail and the swamps nearer Eccardt’s. Her favorite bedding area is the knoll that overlooks Buck Knob. I have caught her there on the knoll laying down more than once.

The Matriarch Moose in 2012 (Photo Taken from Stand #3)

The Matriarch Moose in 2012 (Photo Taken from Stand #3)

I am concerned about her calves. I was confident she had a calf this spring, but saw little sign of it by early fall. My concern is twofold. My first concern is our large bear population. Bears kill far more calves in New England than do coyotes, for example. We got a video of a cow (presumably her) with a calf and a bull at Buck Knob in mid-September.

My second concern is the winter ticks. Tony and I have seen infestations in years past. Calves are the first victims of ticks.

There is one other concern about our matriarch, that maybe she is getting too old to breed. She had at least three different suitors during the rut this past fall. One was a particularly large bull that definitely was the top dog of the mountain.

So if she is still a viable mother, by Memorial Day we should see sign of a calf, or two actually because of this mild winter. Their birth rate is often tied to the mother’s condition after the winter.

Speaking of a mild winter, we just recorded our first two WSI days. Some biologist refer the WSI as Wildlife Survival Index, others the Winter Severity Index. In either case, at this time last year I had recorded 19 WSI days so far for the year, and it extended to every day after that in February. So barring an extreme cold spell and a couple of big storms, this should be a good year for most of the wildlife.

Coyotes do not fare as well in mild winters as you might think. They do better when the deer are forced into yards because of deep snow and make for easy pickings. This might explain why I continue to see coyotes traveling as individuals instead of traveling in packs or family groups that are required to take down larger game. They are in the “every coyote for themselves” mode, concentrating on rodents and small game, which is more easily done by a single animal.

Ruffed grouse (locally called “partridge”) also do better in deep snow because they actually fly into the snow in the afternoon to use the snow as insulation to make it through nights like last night.

Snowshoe hare (or “varying hare”) also bury themselves in the snow for warmth so they are more at risk in extreme cold when there isn’t adequate snow cover.

WLAGS

 

Tracks

Tracks

 

A quick, hour-and-45-minute trip, to J.E. this morning was fairly uneventful. I was hoping to take advantage of the minimal snow cover to do some shed hunting. That proved to be fruitless. The only moose track I found was snow filled, and I never cut a deer track.

There was a lot of track of coyotes, snowshoe hare, bobcat, squirrel, porcupine, and fox. In the photo, you will see a track that frequented the brooks and beaver pond. Any guesses?

Tracks Along the Brook

Tracks Along the Brook

It was a pair of mink, and much of it was very fresh as was some of the hare, coyote, and bobcat tracks. The hare tracks were plentiful, as long as you stayed in the swamps. I concentrated on the swamps because in the past I have had luck there finding moose sheds.

A Shed Moose Antler I Found Years Ago

A Shed Moose Antler I Found Years Ago

There were virtually no tracks in front of the cameras, but some nearby, so I was pleased to get an 8:00 AM video of a big coyote that was very nervous.

We are supposed to get 5” of snow over the next 18 hours so shed hunting will be a lot tougher after that.

WLAGS

Carrie Stevens: A Woman Ahead of Her Time

Carrie Stevens: A Woman Ahead of Her Time

I was 9 years old in the summer of 1954 when my father returned from a fishing trip to the Great North Woods of Maine. I listened intently as he described in detail his adventure—the guides, the lakes, the fish, and the flies. He might as well have gone to Darkest Africa, because it all seemed so unbelievable to me.

After that, I read everything I could get my hands on to learn more about the big brook trout and the most mythical of fish, the landlocked salmon. One article in Field & Stream said that it required more man hours to hook a landlocked salmon than any other fresh water fish. I think it said that it took an average of six hours to hook one and eight hours to land one because of their incredible leaping ability. The one lure or fly that always came up in those articles was the Gray Ghost streamer. That fly was invented by a lady from Upper Dam, Maine by the name of Carrie Stevens.

Carrie Stevens

Carrie Stevens

She was the wife of Wallace, one of the most noted guides at one of the most famous fishing places in the country at the time. Upper Dam was home to a sporting camp that sat at the dam between Mooselookmeguntic and Upper Richardson lakes.

It was the heyday of sport fishing that started in the 1860s and lasted until the 1940s.

Carrie had experience as a milliner and worked with feathers and fur for ladies hats. She soon started tying flies for the sports that came from the big cities to fish these most historic waters.

In 1924 Carrie caught a trophy sized brook trout on a fly partly suggested to her by a friend. It was called the Shang’s (Wheeler) Go Get-Get ‘um for the man that requested a fly with certain colors.

Shang’s (Wheeler) Go Get-Get 'um

Shang’s (Wheeler) Go Get-Get ‘um

She walked to the dam to try it, and she would hook a brook trout so large (6 pounds, 13 ounces), that it would take her over an hour to land the fish. That fish took second place in the Field & Stream contest that year. Today that would be equal to a Super Bowl appearance. She was immediately vaulted to national acclaim, and her flies were in demand from every corner of the continent and Europe.

Her single most famous and consequently most productive pattern was the Gray Ghost. If you were going fishing in the wilds of Maine you had to have one.

Plaque at Upper Dam Dedicated to Carrie Stevens

Plaque at Upper Dam Dedicated to Carrie Stevens

I have a poster in my home that has 120 of her patterns, and she is credited with many more.

Tony and I with the Carrie Stevens Pattern Poster

Tony and I with the Carrie Stevens Pattern Poster

She supported her and her husband with the flies. She tied until 1950, and she lived until 1970. Her flies sold for the handsomely some of $1.50—a lot of money in those days. Today, every manufacturer of fly tying hooks in the world has a Carrie Stevens hooks. They are extra-long shanked and just the right gauge to handle big fish without inhibiting inhibit the action of the fly.

Carrie Stevens Hooks

Carrie Stevens Hooks

No one was every allowed to watch her tie a fly. One of her secrets was that she would glue, I’d love to know what kind of glue, all the feathers together before attaching them to the hook. I can tell you that I have tried that method, and it is just this side of impossible. I have never heard of another fly tier that succeeded in doing that. It would require far more patience than I—and I guess any other tier would—possess.

A Few of My Versions of Carrie Stevens' Flies

A Few of My Versions of Carrie Stevens’ Flies

I give you this history lesson merely so you may better understand my obsession with the flies, the fish (thankfully there still are fish—trout and salmon—born in these waters, never having seen a hatchery), and most of all the places where she and her famous “neighbor” Louise Dickinson Rich lived and fished.

Louise Dickinson Rich

Louise Dickinson Rich

They were two women way ahead of their time, making a life for themselves while living where they wanted to and doing what they wanted to, in what was then a man’s world.

WLAGS