Tracks

Tracks

 

A quick, hour-and-45-minute trip, to J.E. this morning was fairly uneventful. I was hoping to take advantage of the minimal snow cover to do some shed hunting. That proved to be fruitless. The only moose track I found was snow filled, and I never cut a deer track.

There was a lot of track of coyotes, snowshoe hare, bobcat, squirrel, porcupine, and fox. In the photo, you will see a track that frequented the brooks and beaver pond. Any guesses?

Tracks Along the Brook

Tracks Along the Brook

It was a pair of mink, and much of it was very fresh as was some of the hare, coyote, and bobcat tracks. The hare tracks were plentiful, as long as you stayed in the swamps. I concentrated on the swamps because in the past I have had luck there finding moose sheds.

A Shed Moose Antler I Found Years Ago

A Shed Moose Antler I Found Years Ago

There were virtually no tracks in front of the cameras, but some nearby, so I was pleased to get an 8:00 AM video of a big coyote that was very nervous.

We are supposed to get 5” of snow over the next 18 hours so shed hunting will be a lot tougher after that.

WLAGS

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First Spring Update

Well it sure doesn’t look or feel much like spring.

I went out this morning and was discouraged by the snow depths. They ranged from a very low 2” to a very deep 28” after this week’s snow. I’m unfortunately, going to average it out to 18”, right at the WSI minimum. That is the 40th consecutive day and the 54th this season. The average for Washington over the last 50 years is 33. The last year over 40 was 2007 at 69. The last over that was 2002 at 95. Then you have to go back all the way to 1993 to find one over 40, and that was 55.

We need a break, and there is none in the forecast for the next six days. The only upside to this is that all this cold and snow will hopefully help alleviate the moose tick infestation. Something Tony and I have seen firsthand.

On a happier note, I told you I was mounting my two newest cameras one above the other to compare their performance. I set the Bushnell on photo and the Moultrie on video.

The results were mixed. The Bushnell was more sensitive up close and took higher resolution photos. The Moultrie’s only real plus came when it picked up the bobcat again and the Bushnell did not. It was in daylight, 5:45 p.m., and must have been still within the range of about 100’, and obviously not in the range of the Bushnell.

Again the quality of the video is not good, but better than the last one. This time the cat was coming from J.E. If you remember, last time he was headed in in the morning.

Bobcat in the Snow

Bobcat in the Snow

I’m definitely going to move a camera closer to that trail. I changed the Bushnell to video today. The other surprise was I suddenly was inundated with snowshoes.

My friend Roy called this week and invited me to join him hare hunting up this way today. When I told him he would need snowshoes to hunt snowshoes, he changed his mind. He has much less snow at his house about 40 miles southeast of here. He told me he has been seeing deer almost daily. Usually small groups of 3 to 5.

This is the big sugaring weekend up here, with the sugar houses all open to the public. Here and I’m sure north of here, there won’t be a lot of sap being boiled, unfortunately.

Here I am bemoaning that lack of spring when just a few minutes ago while standing on 30+ inches of snow in my garden, I look up and there flying directly over my head was a loon! And I thought I was crazy! He’s not landing anywhere around here with that landing gear.

Loon Flying

Loon Flying

He’s at least as anxious as me, I guess.

THINK SPRING!

WLAGS

Tracks

Despite the high temperature of 17 today, the late winter sun has been melting yesterday’s light snow.

I went down to the mailbox and was surprised to see snowshoe hare tracks going down the middle of the driveway.

Snowshoe Hare Tracks in the Snow

Snowshoe Hare Tracks in the Snow

I was surprised because I have seen so few of their tracks and none of them on the camera, which is very unusual in recent years.

So much so that I have assumed they were in the decline of their cycle.

They might well be, but I almost never see their tracks anywhere around the house except behind the garage or at the compost pile.

There was also fresh gray fox track coming up the driveway.

Gray Fox

Gray Fox

Deaf as I am, I could hear the chickadees and nuthatches singing their spring songs.

White-Breasted Nuthatch

White-Breasted Nuthatch

WLAGS