Winter’s Victim, Part 3: Midnight Coyotes

Winter’s Victim, Part 3: Midnight Coyotes

Midnight on day 3 (March 12) found the coyotes on sight. They fed very aggressively for about 30 minutes. Again, the pair fed in shifts. At 6:30 AM, Blondie made her first appearance of the day.

Blondie Being Cautious

Blondie Being Cautious

She gave us some great photos in that time.

Blondie Feeding

Blondie Feeding

The bobcat stopped by at about 11:00 AM, 12:00 PM, 2:00 PM, and 3:00 PM. Each time, he grabbed a few mouthfuls and then headed into the swamp, seemingly to rest and digest between visits.

Bobcat Coming for Brunch

Bobcat Coming for Brunch

The coyotes returned at dusk. Blondie and her mate returned repeatedly during the night.

Anytime that there wasn’t a predator on the carcass, the ravens would be. You can just picture them sitting safely in the treetops, waiting for any opportunity to swoop in for their share.

Again midnight on day 4 (March 13), found a pair of coyotes already feasting.

Midnight Coyotes

Midnight Coyotes

This was the busiest of days, with more than 700 pictures taken.

A Mouthful

A Mouthful

There was a coyote at the carcass ever hour of the day and night.

Top Dog

Top Dog

They seemed to be trying to deprive the ever-present ravens of even a single bite.

Damn Ravens

Damn Ravens

Blondie showed up in the late afternoon and got her fair share.

Late Afternoon Snack

Late Afternoon Snack

You can clearly see in one photo one coyote waiting in the background while another ate.

The Lookout

The Lookout

This behavior goes against all of the images that I have had in my mind of what takes place at a carcass. I suspect it may be very different if it was a fresh kill, especially if the group took part in the chase and kill.

The consuming took place all night.

WLAGS

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Almost Famous

Almost Famous

Imagine my surprise when I turned to Page 61 of the Maine Open Water & Ice Fishing regulations (Page 63 of the PDF version). There, below the heading Catching and Releasing Fish, was my 18-inch brookie from the Rapid River.

That Photo Looks Familiar

That Photo Looks Familiar

If you’ve been following this blog, you might recognize that photo as a cropped version of the second photo in our August 19, 2014 post “Rapid River: A Challenge and a History Lesson.”

I emailed with the biologist, to whom I had sent the photo three years ago, and he said that he had submitted the photo for the Catch and Release section.

18-Inch Brook Trout in 2012

18-Inch Brook Trout in 2012

He hadn’t remembered where he had gotten the photo. When I reminded him that it was from me, he put Tony’s name on it as a credit on the online version

I told him that I was flattered that he thought enough of the photo and how I handled that fish that he put it in the “release” section of the regs.

I’m starting to see a trend. A year ago, I turned to Page 100 of the June 2014 issue of On the Water, and saw a photo of myself with that 32” pike. Again, it was the second photo in one of our blog posts. This time it was “Sam’s First Pike.”

32”, 8.3# Pike

32”, 8.3# Pike

Again, it was a photo that I had sent to a biologist—this time a New Hampshire biologist.

I guess we should be flattered that our photos of fish are magazine-worthy.

WLAGS